Akai DB4000 tape recorder

Akai DB4000 tape recorder

This one was used for producing our first jingle sets

FRS 40th Anniversary CD

FRS 40th Anniversary CD

Front of 2020 FRS Souvenir CD 

Joop ter Zee

Joop ter Zee

Joop ter Zee in first FRS studio August 1980

Dateq mixing desk

Dateq mixing desk

The 8-channel mixing desk  in PV's studio

7700 tx

7700 tx

Part of the 7700 tx

Cassette Player

Cassette Player

Hanging in tree to avoid RF feedback (in Magic Forest 1981)

Peace

Peace

Cover 'Peace' CD (original station tune since 1980)

FRS Logo

FRS Logo

The FRS logo (with headphone)

Patch & DBX

Patch & DBX

Part of the Patchbay & DBX mic processor

FRS Booklet

FRS Booklet

Cover 40th Anniversary booklet

FRS 10W txs

FRS 10W txs

The original trunk on location with two 10W txs

40W rig

40W rig

40W tx never used (confiscated in Jan. 1983)

8-track Jingle machine

8-track Jingle machine

Used in the early years

Rode mic

Rode mic

Rode broadcaster (studio mic)

SRS Award

SRS Award

SRS  (Sweden) Award 1997

QSL 40th Anniversary

QSL 40th Anniversary

This special QSL was issued in Nov. 2020

FRS goes DX scripts

FRS goes DX scripts

Handwritten scripts were commom inthe 1980s

Pams Jingle Master

Pams Jingle Master

Original tape master from Pams (1987)

Magic Forest

Magic Forest

Between Aug.1980- Jan.1983 all broadcasts emanated from the Magic Forest

Optimod

Optimod

The Optimod is used for the audio processing

QSL Febr. 2007

QSL Febr. 2007

Special QSL issued for broadcast #153

Antennas

Antennas

Antennas for different freqs

QSL July 1980

QSL July 1980

First QSL issued for first successful test 

Valves in 10W tx

Valves in 10W tx

807, L6L & ECC82

Mail

Mail

Many letters from many countries

Studio Dave Scott

Studio Dave Scott

Dave Scott's studio

Search

FRS History 1980-1989

1980

Article Index

Official start
 
Sunday August 31st 1980 will always be remembered as the first official FRS-Holland broadcasting day. Already two weeks earlier- on Sunday August 17th Barry Stephens announced it in his popular DX-Spot on E.M.R.  At 09.45 CET the 10W rig was switched on and 4 hours and 15 minutes later FRS-Holland closed down. It was decided that 6250 would become the fixed 48 mb frequency, not only a good choice but also an easy one because in those days none of the colleague hobby pirates used 6250 on a regular basis. As already previously mentioned: FRSH provided an International flavour of music and information, presented in English, German and Dutch. The introduction of a German Service was an obvious choice because in the course of the years it became more than obvious that the majority of FRS listeners was to be found in East and West Germany although the UK also brought a good number of listeners. The following programme schedule was to be heard in the first months of FRS-Holland's broadcasting life. A good signal was noted in large areas resulting in more than 40 letters from a total of 7 European countries.

QSL IanBiggar 31August1980

10:00

English Service

Barry Stephens

10:30

German Service

Chris

11:00

Musical Express

Fred van Es

11:45

FRS goes DX

Peter Verbruggen

12:15

Album Show

Frankie Fanatic

12:45

FRS Golden Show

Joop ter Zee

13:15

Int. Listeners’Letter Show

Joop & Peter

14:00

Close Down

All times mentioned in CET.

What a start! This gave a good indication of the transmitting range. The 4th Sunday of each month was choosen as FRS-Holland's fixed broadcasting day. More 4th Sunday broadcasts were to be heard Sept. 28th, Oct. 26th and Nov. 23rd of 1980. October 19th was a sad day because of the raid on FRS-Holland's sister-station E.M.R. [The player contains three 1980 audio clips: August 17th  E.M.R. DX announcing FRS' start, August 31st FRS debut broadcast & October 26th 'FRS goes DX' annoucing E.M.R.'s raid the week before (use the little slider on the lower right corner)].

Move to third Sunday; 41 MB test
In October 1980 FRS improved the service to its listeners with the introduction of a written info package containing no less tha KDKC Cover Nov 200 copy 1n 6 pages, supplying them with all kind of valuable info about the station. As a direct result of E.M.R. 's raid, the programme schedule was slightly adjusted as from November onwards: FRS started with E.M.R. relays between 09.30- 10.30 CET. At the same time a move was made to the 3rd Sunday. That same month FRS headed the cover of the German Köln-Dusseldorfer Kurzwelle Club (KDKC). In those days a very popular magazine among German (free radio) DXers. A good promotion! The month of December brought an important change. Peter V. was visited by Barry Stephens and together with Bobby Speed, the FRS transmitter engineer, they tested two new 10W rigs which were sent from the UK the previous month. December 14th 1980 it was the first time that two transmitters were running in parallel from the secret FRS location. Frequencies which were used were 6250 & 7325 kHz in the 41 metre band. The FRS crew felt it would be much more efficient to add a second frequency in the 41 mb. If one frequency would suffer from interference, there was always the possibility for the listeners to switch to the second one. Besides: the 41 mb provided better possibilities for medium and long distance reception, for example in Scandinavia, France and the northern part of the UK and Scotland. The decision to use a second frequency proved to be a bull’s eye: satisfactory reception reports were received for the 14th December test broadcast, much to the satisfaction of the FRS team. 

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