Akai DB4000 tape recorder

Akai DB4000 tape recorder

This one was used for producing our first jingle sets

FRS 40th Anniversary CD

FRS 40th Anniversary CD

Front of 2020 FRS Souvenir CD 

Joop ter Zee

Joop ter Zee

Joop ter Zee in first FRS studio August 1980

Dateq mixing desk

Dateq mixing desk

The 8-channel mixing desk  in PV's studio

7700 tx

7700 tx

Part of the 7700 tx

Cassette Player

Cassette Player

Hanging in tree to avoid RF feedback (in Magic Forest 1981)

Peace

Peace

Cover 'Peace' CD (original station tune since 1980)

FRS Logo

FRS Logo

The FRS logo (with headphone)

Patch & DBX

Patch & DBX

Part of the Patchbay & DBX mic processor

FRS Booklet

FRS Booklet

Cover 40th Anniversary booklet

FRS 10W txs

FRS 10W txs

The original trunk on location with two 10W txs

40W rig

40W rig

40W tx never used (confiscated in Jan. 1983)

8-track Jingle machine

8-track Jingle machine

Used in the early years

Rode mic

Rode mic

Rode broadcaster (studio mic)

SRS Award

SRS Award

SRS  (Sweden) Award 1997

QSL 40th Anniversary

QSL 40th Anniversary

This special QSL was issued in Nov. 2020

FRS goes DX scripts

FRS goes DX scripts

Handwritten scripts were commom inthe 1980s

Pams Jingle Master

Pams Jingle Master

Original tape master from Pams (1987)

Magic Forest

Magic Forest

Between Aug.1980- Jan.1983 all broadcasts emanated from the Magic Forest

Optimod

Optimod

The Optimod is used for the audio processing

QSL Febr. 2007

QSL Febr. 2007

Special QSL issued for broadcast #153

Antennas

Antennas

Antennas for different freqs

QSL July 1980

QSL July 1980

First QSL issued for first successful test 

Valves in 10W tx

Valves in 10W tx

807, L6L & ECC82

Mail

Mail

Many letters from many countries

Studio Dave Scott

Studio Dave Scott

Dave Scott's studio

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FRS History 1980-1989

1980

Article Index

Successful test, preparations
Main problem was that the home built transmitter didn't work at all. There was a close contact with Barry Stephens and this resulted in the problem being solved: it appeared there was a wrong wire-connection to the PA 807 valve thus making it impossible to put out any reasonable signal. It was quite logical Bobby Speed didn't discover what the problem was because that wrong connection was also part of the circuit diagram of the transmitter! On Sunday June 22nd 1980 a second attempt was made between 11.00- 13.30 CET on 6265 kHz. Two letters were received, not to wonder when knowing the actual SWR was 1:5 meaning only very little power was radiated by the aerial. Wrongdoer was the coax feeder. A new aerial was constructed and on Sunday July 27th the first successful FRS-Holland test was carried out between 11.00- 12.30 CET on 6250 although 6265 was announced in the show. No less than 23 letters were received from 5 European countries

The success of this test was a kind of stimulant for the people behind FRS-H. and immediately preparations started to commence regular monthly transmissions. It was indespensable to use a reliable Post Office Box. Through Barry Stephens. Peter V. got in touch QSL NickSharpe 27JUL80 with Michael Burden who run the in those days famous Kent Place address. To this day former FRS deejays still know that address like the back of their hand: Kent Place/ Norwell/ Newark/ Notts in England. QSL ThomasDrescher 22June1980 Another important   task was to find broadcasting staff. PV was already involved in a local radio station called ABC Music Radio and that made things rather easy. Fred van Es and Frankie Fanatic were asked. In a local pub PV met Joop ter Zee and within a few days Joop joined the FRS-H. team. Bobby Speed wasalready involved because of his technical skills and via the local hospital radio Chris was approached. The same applies to E.M.R.'s Barry S.: he completed the deejay line-up. Things were treated very seriously : Joop & Peter recorded the very first FRS jingle-package, qsl cards and stickers were printed and most important: a broadcasting-schedule was put together. There were a number of reasons for starting up FRS-Holland: offering people in countries like East and West-Germany, where the radio-situation wasn't particularly satisfactory, a real alternative was one reason. FRS felt it was the right moment for a Dutch station on SW among all the British ones and wanted to maintain the people's interest in free radio. The main idea however was to bring entertainment to the audience based on a wide variety of musical and informative programmes. Only music was in the opinion of the FRS people not enough to satisfy the SW audience because most of the listeners are real radio-enthusiasts interested in more than only playing top 40 records. For that reason a DX and Mailbag Show were included in the programming.

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